Resources

What is a Job Shadow?

A Job Shadow is where you follow around a professional—like a shadow—for part of their work day. During a job shadow, you gain firsthand knowledge of... Read More...

A Job Shadow is where you follow around a professional—like a shadow—for part of their work day. During a job shadow, you gain firsthand knowledge of a job and this helps give you a clearer picture of what you like, don’t like, what you didn’t even know existed, and what you want your future to look like! It’s different from an internship and apprenticeship, in that it is non-committing (like taking a car for a test-drive), even though you still want to treat it seriously.

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Q — What are the next steps to take if someone says yes to my job shadow request?
A — First off, be sure to thank them! Then, confirm the date and time for the job shadow. Here’s where you should ask any initial questions you might have, including where to park, where to check-in, what to bring and even what to wear. Don’t forget to inform your teachers, counselors and parents about which day you will be attending the job shadow. Make sure that you make arrangements to make-up your assignments.

Q — What do I do if it takes a while to get a response from my job shadow request?
A — Note that it may take a few days to hear a response. If you don’t hear anything after 3-5 days, go ahead and follow-up with an email or phone call to see if you can offer the employer more information about yourself and your inquiry.

Q — What if an employer does not accept my job shadow request?
A — Not every employer you reach out to will have availability to host a job shadow. So, if your request is denied, be sure to still be gracious and thank them for their time. After all, they did take time out of their busy day to get back to you. Feel free to ask, in the same “thank you” email, why you were passed on or if you can try again in the future. Don’t give up hope—Try connecting with a different company and follow the same initial steps that you took when you requested this job shadow. As hard as it might be to hear no, don’t press the company to offer you a job shadow if they have said no. And don’t take it personally!

Q — What should I wear?
A — Your attire totally depends on what type of job shadow you’re headed to.
Shadowing a mechanic? Jeans or tough-fabric pants accompanied by closed-toe shoes will be just fine.
Spending the day with a vet? Jeans might be okay, but they might prefer khakis. For employers like this, it might be best to ask but always opt for closed-toe shoes.
If you’re heading into an office to shadow an accountant or someone with a similar job, something more formal will be best. Boys, iron those button-down shirts and slip into a pair of slacks. Be sure to tuck in your shirt and don’t forget a belt! Girls, opt for a knee-length skirt or dress. Slacks and a nice button down will also work.
If you’re not sure what you should wear, don’t be afraid to ask the individual you’ll be shadowing!

Q — What will I be doing during my job shadow?
A — You’re there to observe and learn, so you’ll be doing just that. You might spend time with one individual the entire time or you might hop among several employees. The intention is for you to gain hands-on insight into what a certain job or position looks and feels like. Don’t forget that a job shadow can lead to future opportunities like internships, professional references, or jobs, so show up ready to WOW the professional you’re shadowing.

Q — What should I ask during my job shadow?
A — Don’t be worried about asking too many questions. You’re there to learn, so ask away! Try some of these out:
What steps did you take to get this job/role?
What are the necessary skills or qualifications to be successful in this role?
What do you like about your job?
What are some challenges you face regularly?
What is the culture at your company like? Why is that culture important to you?
Are there any professional development opportunities offered here?
What does the future hold for your role? What about your company?
What is one thing about your position that most people don’t know or understand?
What could I be doing in my life, as a high school student, to help prepare me for a job like this?
What education or training did you receive after high school?
What’s the best piece of career advice you’ve ever been given?

Q — Do I need to provide a resume?
A — You don’t need one… but it could be helpful! It could also be great practice for when you will need to write one down the road. If you have a general resume, it will give the individual that you’re shadowing some insight into your skills, qualifications, and accomplishments prior to your job shadow.

Q — I’ve never “marketed” myself or written a pitch. What should I include?
A — You know yourself best, so we can guide you, but ultimately, you’re the only person that can market YOU!

Try reversing the roles: Imagine that someone was job shadowing you. How would you answer the questions you might get asked? Touch on what makes you YOU.
What are your interests? Hobbies? Passions?
What are your goals in life? What’s next for you? Why do you want to take that path/route?
What have you accomplished in your life?
What are some of your proudest achievements?

Below are some written examples for branding. Check them out then take a stab at writing your own! You might want to reference this during a phone call or when writing an email to request a job shadow.

EXAMPLE ONE
My name is John Doe. I am a 16-year-old sophomore at Ada County High School and I am really passionate about robotics. My interest began my freshman year when I joined the robotics club. I plan on taking more math and science classes next year so that I can keep learning more about this topic. Taking these classes will also help me pursue this passion because it will help me to study engineering or a similar path in college. There, I will learn how to design tools and robots, which might lead me to the healthcare or agricultural fields. I’d love to spend a few hours, or the day, observing a robotics engineer to get some hands-on experience. This would help me get a better understanding of the steps I need to take to shape my future.

EXAMPLE TWO
My name is Jane Doe and I am interested in both cosmetology and nursing. I love taking care of others and I am great at listening to the needs and wants of the people I work with. For a project at school, I recently researched both fields and learned a lot about both career paths, but I would love to discover more by job shadowing professionals in each of these fields. Gettings hands-on experience will definitely help me narrow down my choice so I can have a better idea of what I’d like to do with my future.

Q — What should I do during a job shadow?
A — Do be confident. Take advantage of this opportunity. Speak up and ask questions. The more you put into the job shadow, the more you’ll get out of it.
Do mind your manners. Don’t forget your Please and Thank yous.
Do prepare. Research the individual you’re shadowing ahead of time. Prepare questions to ask and learn more about the company he or she works for and the industry that he or
she works in.
Do pay attention to the different people that interact with the role your job shadowing. Try to understand how the role interacts with a team.

Q — What shouldn’t I do during a job shadow?
A — Do NOT be late!
Do NOT be too casual with your communication. Keep your word choice professional while still being you.
Do NOT post anything negative or controversial on social media.
Do NOT cancel your job shadow unless you have an emergency. If the employer has arranged to host you, then he or she is expecting you and has adjusted his or her work
schedule to accommodate your visit.
Do NOT take personal phone calls, text, or browse social media. Value the time by being fully present.

What is FAFSA?

FAFSA stands for Free Application for Federal Student Aid and is used by colleges or post-secondary programs to determine how much financial aid you will receive to go to school. So what is it and why is it so important? Read More...

FAFSA stands for Free Application for Federal Student Aid and is used by colleges or post-secondary programs to determine how much financial aid you will receive to go to school. So what is it and why is it so important? There are a few types of aid in the FAFSA, so you could receive a Grant (which doesn’t have to be repaid, unless you drop out), you might be offered a Loan (aka you’ll borrow money that you’ll have to pay back with interest), and/or you may be eligible for federal work-study (working on or off-campus to cover part of your tuition). Now, you don’t need to accept financial aid if you don’t want, but completing the FAFSA will at least let you know what you are eligible to get to help you pay for school.

When working on the FAFSA, you’ll be asked questions about yourself and your family, including financial info, because this affects how much aid you’ll be eligible to receive. If you identify as a dependent student (where you still depend on your parent or guardian support), you’ll need your parents or guardian to help complete the form, but if you’re independent, you can complete it yourself. If you have questions, it’s best to check with your school counselor or a staff-member you trust. Your high school may even offer to help with completing the FAFSA and make sense of the questions they’re asking through something like a FAFSA night. You can also contact the financial aid office of the school you want to attend after graduation and they could suggest some work-study jobs where you are employed at school to help cover expenses. Important: if you are completing the form online, make sure you are on the actual FAFSA site at https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/fafsa. There are some imposter sites out there!

What is the difference between an Unsubsidized Loan, a Subsidized Loan, and a Private Loan?

A lot of people have tried to put this easily, so we'll give this our shot too. Loans are money you're borrowing and in the case with a Federal Loan, you're borrowing money from the United States Government. Read More...

A lot of people have tried to put this easily, so we’ll give this our shot too. Loans are money you’re borrowing and in the case with a Federal Loan, you’re borrowing money from the United States Government. Loans usually carry an interest fee, which is like a tax that is added on to the amount you borrow and is included on the payments you make over time.

Now for the difference. A federal subsidized loan means that while you’re in school (and up to 6-9 months after) the government will pay for the interest on the loan. On the other hand, a federal unsubsidized loan, means the interest has started accumulating towards your balance while you’re in school and you’ll have to pay that back. So if you took out $10,000 when you started school, the amount due after graduation will be different by your senior year depending on whether you have a subsidized or unsubsidized loan. The decision is made by the government as to which loan you’ll be eligible for when you complete the FAFSA, but if you end up needing to borrow money to pay for college, the government gives you this option regardless of your credit and usually at a lower interest rate than you would get with a private loan.

Loans from the government are one thing; you can always go to a bank or another organization to see if you can get a private loan and compare how much money you can borrow, how long you have to pay the money back, and see which has a better interest rate as well. One thing to keep an eye out for with private loans is credit checks and fees, because some places might offer you a low interest rate but have extra fees that you’ll have to pay to borrow the money. It’s a lot to wrap your head around, but in your best interest (get it?) to talk this over and ask as many questions as you can so you can minimize the amount you’ll be in charge of paying to go to school. We suggest contacting your bank or looking into verified private lenders on trusted websites.

Why do I have to take the SAT or ACT?

We know: 99.9% of the time, tests are not fun and even less fun when they're a few hours long on weekends. The question is 'do I have to take the SAT or ACT?' and the honest answer is, 'it depends.' Public high schools... Read More...

We know: 99.9% of the time, tests are not fun and even less fun when they’re a few hours long on weekends. The question is “do I have to take the SAT or ACT?” and the honest answer is, “it depends.” Public high schools in Idaho require you to take one of the tests and some post-secondary schools in Idaho require this for admission, but not all. The SAT and ACT can be used for admission by some schools but they can also be used to decide how much financial aid you’ll receive or improve your chances for receiving a scholarship. On the flip side, if you apply to a school that asks for these tests and don’t score how you’d like, admissions will look at other things like GPA, extracurricular activities, letters of recommendation, or your essay.

So to sum it up, you don’t have to take either one of these or get a perfect score, but it may be required by your high school or wherever you plan on going afterwards (unless you’re on an Individual Education Plan that exempts these tests). Currently, the state of Idaho pays for public high school students to take the SAT, but you can pay out of pocket to take the ACT instead. Also, there are a lot of resources to help you make sense of the test and even prepare for it. We have a pretty cool video about the SAT (see below) and both the SAT and ACT have twitter accounts to help you practice: @SATQuestion and @ACTStudent.

I'm going to take a standardized test, but which do I choose? ACT or SAT? Or both??

So what's the big difference?? There really isn't. They're both pretty similar in content, length, and style with some minor distinctions (3 subjects vs 4). They're also both accepted... Read More...

So what’s the big difference?? There really isn’t. They’re both pretty similar in content, length, and style with some minor distinctions (3 subjects vs 4). They’re also both accepted at virtually all 2 or 4-year colleges. The neat thing is that you have 7 shots to take either throughout the year, and the school you want to attend will take the best score. **Word to the wise, don’t plan on taking a test 7 times because that’s a lot of sitting down and it looks like overkill from a school’s perspective which could count against you** If you have time though, you could even take both and see which one works out better for you. Some schools like seeing that you take both because it gives a better picture of you as a candidate to the admissions team. If you prefer one over the other, the ACT or SAT test scores can also be converted to each other by the admissions teams.

What is a College Credit?

A credit is a unit of measurement that colleges use to determine how much work you're putting into a course and semester. For every credit hour earned, the expectation is... Read More...

A credit is a unit of measurement that colleges use to determine how much work you’re putting into a course and semester. For every credit hour earned, the expectation is that students take 3 additional (uncredited) hours outside of class to study and complete assignments.

Colleges and universities use credit hours to determine cost of attendance and program completion. Financial aid usually requires students to be at least a part-time student (taking at least 6 credit hours per semester) or a full-time college student (12+ credit hours per semester). Students taking more than 15 credit hours usually have a lot to handle and it may not be advised to take that many classes unless you’re good at balancing your schedule or don’t have too many obligations outside of school.

What are Dual Credit Classes and AP Classes?

Dual Credit classes are college-level classes where you earn credit for both high school graduation requirement and for college credit after successfully completing the course. Read More...

Dual Credit classes are college-level classes where you earn credit for both high school graduation requirement and for college credit after successfully completing the course. AP Classes are high school classes that are focused on a final exam and depending on how you score, you may earn credit towards a college or university. The really cool thing is that if you do well on either, you’ll be saving money and time by not having to take the same class in college. On top of that, the state has given each public high school student and charter school student $4,125 to take dual credit classes and pay for exams, including AP tests!

Colleges and universities all have their own policy on accepting dual credits or AP test scores, so it’s good to check with your counselor or the schools you’re considering attending to see if they’ll accept what you’ve earned.

**One other thing to note is that if you fail a dual-credit class, you’re basically failing a college-class and that will go on both transcripts! On top of that, you’ll have to pay out of your own pocket to retake the course. If you’re taking a dual-credit class for the first time, take it seriously. Use it to get familiar with the style and pace of college classes.

Where can I find scholarships to help pay for school?

There are a lot of scholarship resources out there. You can search online or find a lot in your local community and school. Here's a list of some free scholarship search engines/resources. Read More...

There are a lot of scholarship resources out there. You can search online or find a lot in your local community and school. Here’s a list of some free scholarship search engines/resources. If you come across others, let us know! Caution: there are a lot of sites out there, but you shouldn’t have to pay for a scholarship search and don’t provide personal information if you’re not sure about it! Some sites will ask you for information to give you better results, but ask us or a peer if you’re unsure.

How can I prepare for college, work, volunteering, or the military while in high school?

That's a pretty big question and there's a lot of ground to cover, but here's a general checklist of things to get you ready for whatever's on the other side of the door for you, whether it's in four years or a few months... Read More...

That’s a pretty big question and there’s a lot of ground to cover, but here’s a general checklist of things to get you ready for whatever’s on the other side of the door for you, whether it’s in four years or a few months:

  1. Talk to people about your ideas and interests! Everyone thinks about what they want to do or what they like doing, but it also helps talking about them. That way, you’ll learn more about yourself and start making sense of things. You might even have some suggestions come at you or even make some connections to get you going in the right direction!
  2. If you have the ability, take classes in areas that you want to focus on. Take classes in woodshop if you want to be an architect or want to go into construction. Want to go into finance? Take some extra math or econ classes.
  3. Visit. If you plan on going to college after school, visit the schools you would like to attend. A college tour will help you be sure about your decision and give you a new perspective aside from what you see online. If you want to go out and work after high school, visit some employers in your field of interest whether on a school trip or maybe just by stopping by. You could even score a job shadow after talking to employers. Talk to your counselor about this if you don’t know how to get started.
  4. Start building up your cred–whether it’s volunteering, getting involved in extracurricular activities at school, or working a part-time job, it all helps you stand out above the crowd and prep you for a better position wherever it is you want to go! Those things also look good on resumes.
  5. Get your paperwork ready–enlistment documents, housing paperwork, or vaccination records. Get those ducks in a row and check in with program personnel to see if you need to work on anything else.
  6. Pass your classes. This one’s obvious, but If you don’t graduate, you may not be accepted into the program you want to pursue and most employers require a diploma or GED before considering you for an interview.
  7. Prepare financially. Even if you’re volunteering or going into the military, the money you set aside can help you from entertainment to cases of emergency. The big thing is to make sure you have some money set aside and can access it.

How can I find volunteer opportunities?

Volunteer opportunities are a fantastic way for you to get some experience working with others or for a cause... Read More...

Volunteer opportunities are a fantastic way for you to get some experience working with others or for a cause while helping you build your resume and figure out some things you like (and don’t like). Volunteering can consist of coordinating and participating in fun activities with senior citizens, helping walk dogs and clean kennels at the animal shelter, reading to children at the local library, among many other things.

If you’re looking to give volunteering a try, your school and its extracurricular activities may have lots of opportunities available for you to check out. Even your school’s career and college counselor may have some info on what’s available; otherwise, you can reach out to local institutions like your local library, church, animal shelter, food pantry, homeless shelter, retirement home and inquire about volunteering with them.

And if you want to surf some websites to see what’s around your community when it comes to volunteering, give these sites a try:

https://serve.idaho.gov/

https://www.justserve.org/about (search by zip code)

https://www.volunteercrowd.com/

https://www.allforgood.org/

https://www.idealist.org

https://www.volunteermatch.org/

https://www.volunteercrowd.com/

 

What's an internship?

An internship is basically work experience with an employer or organization for a predetermined amount of time. Internships are a good opportunity for students and job seekers to gain skills and experience... Read More...

An internship is basically work experience with an employer or organization for a predetermined amount of time. Internships are a good opportunity for students and job seekers to gain skills and experience that help prepare them for future careers.

Internships have pros and cons in that interns get that work experience to put on their resume and could potentially land a job within the same company once the internship is over–but internships don’t always pay well or at all and post-internship employment is no guarantee. There is also no standardization for internships and the scope of work and expectations can vary by employer and location; some organizations bring on interns from around the country and others are only looking for local talent to bring on for a few months.

If you’re looking to explore the idea of an internship, openings are usually placed around college campuses as well as areas where job postings are found (think Monster.com, Indeed.com, the local library, etc.). You should also ask your high school counselor about local internships during the school year or over the summer. If you can connect with an employer on a field trip or at a job fair, ask about internships. They may have opportunities for the summer or could even create an internship for the right individual (you).

When you find an internship opportunity, make sure to read the requirements and details about the application process for the position. If you’re unsure about a posting because it seems sketchy or vague, have a friend look at it or do some searching online about the organization/employer. Don’t give out your information online until you know you can trust a site or a posting.

What's an Apprenticeship?

The main difference between an apprenticeship and an internship is that internships are more exploratory whereas apprenticeships are focused on a certain career in a profession or trade. Apprenticeships are... Read More...

The main difference between an apprenticeship and an internship is that internships are more exploratory whereas apprenticeships are focused on a certain career in a profession or trade. Apprenticeships are also directed towards employment and competency within that field and offer competitive wages, on-the-job training, and instruction for the apprentice. Apprenticeships have been gaining more and more traction around the country in recent years and are a great option for students who are sure of what they want to do after high school.

In Idaho, many types of business and industry offer apprenticeships, from technology to healthcare. The majority of employers are small and have less than 50 employees, but big companies take on apprentices as well, like St. Luke’s for positions like medical assistants.

The duration of an apprenticeship can vary. Most apprenticeship programs require three to four years of work combined with study to complete, but the requirement varies by trade and can be as little as one year or at most six years. Apprentices are also paid on an increasing scale through the time of the apprenticeship, usually starting at about 40-50% of what a journeyman or certified professional makes in the industry and getting up to 100% upon completion.

There is another opportunity for high schoolers called a School-To-Registered Apprenticeship Program, (STRAP), where juniors or seniors can earn credit through on-the-job training and related instruction. After completing the apprenticeship, students receive a nationally recognized certificate of completion that will show their skill and commitment to a certain profession. To learn more about STRAP, ask your local high school counselor for more information.